As above . . .

. . . so below

The figure of the goddess is shown in manifestation . . . In this card she is definitely personified as a human-seeming figure; she is represented as bearing two cups, one golden, held high above her head, from which she pours water upon it.

(These cups resemble breasts, as it is written: “the milk of the stars from her paps; yea, the milk of the stars from her paps”).

The Universe is here resolved into its ultimate elements. (One is tempted to quote from the Vision of the Lake Pasquaney, “Nothingness with twinkles. . . but what twinkles!”) . . .

Most prominent among its features is the seven-pointed Star of Venus, as if declaring the principal characteristic of her nature to be Love. . . .

From the golden cup she pours this ethereal water, which is also milk and oil and blood, upon her own head, indicating the eternal renewal of the categories, the inexhaustible possibilities of existence.

JC's silver cup

The left hand, lowered, holds a silver cup, from which also she pours the immortal liquor of her life. (This liquor is the Amrita of the Indian philosophers, the Nepenthe and Ambrosia of the Greeks, the Alkahest and Universal Medicine of the Alchemists, the Blood of the Grail; or, rather, the nectar which is the mother of that blood. She pours it upon the junction of land and water. (Aleister Crowley)

"You've opened heaven's portal here on earth for this poor mortal . . ."

Monumental Monolith

Arthur Waite: "17. The Star, Dog-Star, or Sirius, also called fantastically the Star of the Magi."

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